October 29th, 2018
Kick Start Your funding: Looking Beyond NIH and NSF

Funding for scientific research is becoming progressively harder to obtain and competition continues to grow. Despite the increased challenge to gain federal funding (i.e. NIH), many universities and other institutions require their applicants to have funding when applying for faculty positions, regardless of their career stage. As such, an enormous amount of pressure is placed on trainees to obtain funding prior to looking for a position as an independent scientist. In addition, early career investigators who have already transitioned to independent positions also experience similar pressures and difficulties obtaining funding. In recognition of the funding crisis as well as the increasingly competitive job market for trainees and early career investigators, the goal of this symposium is to provide information on funding sources outside of the NIH and NSF. We have four speakers with each representing less tradition funding mechanisms including 1) industry, 2) private foundations, 3) crowd-funding, and 4) military funding. Each speaker identifies how to find funding within their genre, provide information and tips for writing successful grant proposals, and compare and contrast their organization with how other funding mechanisms (i.e. NIH) work. The speakers have either successfully obtained funding or are representatives from companies or private foundations that have grant programs or regularly fund product research. Information is also available on crowd funding websites.

Presentations

  • Seeking funding outside the norm: unique opportunities within military research programs
    Lisa Leon, Ph.D.US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine
  • Successfully securing funding and collaborating with industry
    Eugene W. Shek, Ph.D.Lilly China Research and Development Co., Ltd.
  • Cancer funding from a private foundation
    Charles Saxe, Ph.D.The American Cancer Society
  • Crowd funding your science
    Melissa Wilson Sayres, Ph.D.Arizona State University

 You can find links to all presentations here:

http://www.the-aps.org/mm/Careers/Mentor/Kick-Start-your-funding-Looking-beyond-NIH-and-NSF

Melinda Engevik, PhD is an instructor at Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine. Her research focuses on the interaction between intestinal microbiota and the host epithelium.
October 10th, 2018
October 2018 Social Media Collection: Borrowing Skills from Business

Leadership, management, budgeting, and marketing sound like skills for CEOs, not scientists. However, these skill sets are also essential for researchers and there are several principles that can be taken from the business world and applied to academia. Accumulating evidence suggests that mixing business with science is a path to success.

Post #1: This month we will be discussing Borrowing skills from business: application for research, stay tuned!

 

Post #2:  Business principles for basic researchers

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2016/10/business-principles-basic-researchers 

 

 

Post #3: Why scientists need to market themselves

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02747-y

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #4: The Why and How of Promoting Your Science Publication Online

https://bitesizebio.com/27823/the-why-and-how-of-promoting-your-science-publication-online/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #5: Selling for scientists

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2014/03/21/selling-for-scientists/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #6 Develop your career label so that it works in your favor

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/09/develop-your-career-label-so-it-works-your-favor

 

 

 

 

Post #7: How to market yourself as a graduate student

https://www.grad.umn.edu/marketingyourself

 

Post #8: Postdoc advancement: Marketing your value

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2013/08/postdoc-advancement-marketing-your-value

 

 

Post #9: Do I make myself clear? Media training for scientists

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2018/01/do-i-make-myself-clear-media-training-scientists

 

 

 

 

 

Post #10: Improving science communication in 3 easy steps

https://www.novartis.com/stories/from-our-labs/improving-science-communication-3-easy-steps

 

Post #11: The Basics of Lab Management

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2012/05/lab-management

 

Post #12: Project Management for Scientists

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/07/project-management-scientists

 

Post #13: Project Management for Scientists, Part 1: An Overview

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/05/project-management-scientists-part-1-overview

 

Post #14: Project Management for Scientists, Part 2: Getting Experience

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/06/project-management-scientists-part-2-getting-experience

 

Post #15: Project Management for Postdocs

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/03/take-your-worst-estimate-and-double-it-project-management-postdocs

 

Post #16: Crowdsourcing goes academic with platforms for reviewing advisers

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/02/crowdsourcing-goes-academic-platforms-reviewing-advisers

 

Post #17: These books can offer career guidance and inspiration

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/09/these-books-can-offer-career-guidance-and-inspiration

Melinda Engevik, PhD is an instructor at Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine. Her research focuses on the interaction between intestinal microbiota and the host epithelium.
September 28th, 2018
Discovering the Leader Within You: Where You’ve Been

What are the factors that will make you achieve your scientific career goals? In this presentation, Dr. Thomas Herzig uses a new perspective to discuss the importance of developing different sets of skills according to your career purposes. These skills will complement your CV (education and publications record) and will help you prepare towards the next step of your professional career.

Presentation features Captain Thomas Herzig, PhD

Link of the presentation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0yPtl3Z878

http://www.the-aps.org/leadership

 

Miguel Zarate, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. His research focuses on the interactions between the fetal immune system and nutrient metabolism in inflammatory challenge and intra-uterine growth restriction models in sheep, mice, and humans.
September 10th, 2018
September 2018 Social Media Collection: Science Communication

Science communication is relevant for all professionals nowadays. Educating citizenry is essential to understand the role of science in people’s lives. Likewise, improving your communication skills can help you tremendously towards the next steps in your career either in academia or industry. Sharing our research effectively can reduce the gap of uncertainty that we scientists often have with non-expert audiences. The following posts will teach you how to be an effective communicator by learning science communication tips and reading successful stories.

 

Post #1: How to improve your communication skills in science

https://www.aaas.org/comm-toolkit

 

Post #2:  how to explain your science in different situations

https://www.nia.nih.gov/research/blog/2014/11/explaining-your-science-tips-clear-communication 

 

Post #3: How can you get noticed in your early career? (for students)

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2011/03/16/phd-students-how-to-improve-your-communication-skills-and-why-you-should/ 

 

Post #4: Why is necessary to have effective science communication to the non-expert? The story of Elizabeth Bass

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.023297?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&

 

Post #5: Could baby’s first bacteria take root before birth? A controversial science topic explained for all audiences.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-00664-8 

 

Post #6: 11 tips for communicating science to the public.

https://www.aaas.org/blog/qualia/11-tips-communicating-science-public

 

Post #7: Podcast. Alan Alda’s experiment: helping scientists learn to talk to the rest of us.

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/04/531271710/alan-aldas-experiment-helping-scientists-learn-to-talk-to-the-rest-of-us

 

Post #8: 14 current hot science topics and an effective way to describe their importance to the non-expert.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/here-are-stories-will-make-science-headlines-2018

 

Miguel Zarate, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. His research focuses on the interactions between the fetal immune system and nutrient metabolism in inflammatory challenge and intra-uterine growth restriction models in sheep, mice, and humans.
July 27th, 2018
Negotiating Is a Skill – Let’s Learn It Together

Negotiation is both a skill and an art. Understanding your strengths and weakness will help you to best promote yourself and succeed in interviews and getting the position you are aiming for. By learning about your personality type, and that of others, you will be able to not only put your best foot forward, but to utilize your knowledge to manage expectations of other personality types. We will open a window onto the negotiation skills for every step of the way, from getting a position to climbing the ladder of success in diverse settings. Getting a position is not the end of the negotiation process. These skills will continue to be useful throughout your career as you ask for promotions, work in committees, move into new spaces, apply for both internal and external grants, and navigate the hierarchy at your institution. The Women in Physiology Mentoring Symposium for EB 2016 will focus on what negotiation really is: using the right tools and the right approach to succeed in any discipline. To address this issue, we will discuss personality types, help you to determine yours and teach you skills to maximize your strengths based on your gender and your own personality. In addition, negotiation skills will be discussed, both in general and in more specific areas with a panel of speakers from various fields, including academia, industry and the military. These speakers will give an overview of specific negotiation skills related to these environments, including issues you should be aware of, what you should ask for, how to ask, and what’s “soft” in each setting. These presentations will be followed by an additional 20 minutes question and answer session with the speaker panel.

 

Presentations

  • Making Your Personality Type Work for You
    Diane Klotz, Sanford Burnham Presby Medical Discovery Institute
  • Negotiation 101: Skills Everyone Needs
    Trevor Blair, Manpower 
  • Negotiation 201: Industry Sales/Marketing
    Katherine Atkinson, Illumina, Inc.
  • Negotiation 201: Industry R&D
    Magdalena Alonso-Galicia, Bayer HealthCare LLC 
  • Negotiation 201: Academia Research
    Kim BarrettUCSD
  • Negotiation 201: Academia Teaching
    Jennifer K Uno, Elon Univ. 
  • Negotiation 201: Military
    Kathy Ryan, US Army Institute of Surgical Res,
  • Panel Discussion

 

You can find links to all presentations here: http://www.the-aps.org/negotiating

https://www.lifescitrc.org/searchResultsAll.cfm?resourceID=35

Malgorzata Kasztan, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She researches how the endothelin system alters renal structure and function in chronic kidney disease.
July 11th, 2018
July 2018 Social Media Collection: Negotiation

Negotiation is both a skill and an art. Understanding your strengths and weakness will help you to best promote yourself and succeed in interviews and getting the position you are aiming for. By learning about your personality type, and that of others, you will be able to not only put your best foot forward, but to utilize your knowledge to manage expectations of other personality types.

 

 

Post #1:  Want to learn more about negotiating? Start reading our July “Negotiation series”. First round – “Know These Things Before Negotiating”

http://theprofessorisin.com/2018/02/09/know-these-things-before-negotiating/

Post #2: Can I negotiate?

http://theprofessorisin.com/2016/03/21/can-i-negotiate-advice-for-all-especially-international-ph-d-s/

Post #3: Academic Scientists at Work: Negotiating a Faculty Position

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2005/02/academic-scientists-work-negotiating-faculty-position-0

Post #4: How to negotiate your tenure track offer?

http://theprofessorisin.com/2016/02/11/how-to-negotiate-your-tenure-track-offer/

Post #5:  Do’s and Don’ts! Round 5 – How (Not) to Negotiate a Tenure Track Salary

http://theprofessorisin.com/2017/02/24/how-not-to-negotiate-a-tenure-track-salary/ 

Post #6: Dual career couples have become a norm. How to search and negotiation for two 

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/06/until-academic-careers-do-us-part

Post #7: What does it take to make an institution more diverse?

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05317-4

Post #8: Managing Up in Academe. Let’s learn about effective professional communication and productivity!

https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2018/04/16/how-work-most-effectively-your-supervisor-opinion?

Post #9: Negotiating As Therapy

http://theprofessorisin.com/2018/03/16/negotiating-as-therapy/

Post #10: Job X Is Not Job Y (And Wishing Won’t Make It So)

http://theprofessorisin.com/2018/04/21/job-x-is-not-job-y-and-wishing-wont-make-it-so/

Post #11:  Negotiation Tactics and Strategies

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2000/03/negotiation-tactics-and-strategies

Malgorzata Kasztan, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She researches how the endothelin system alters kidney structure and function in different models of chronic kidney disease.
June 21st, 2018
Recognizing Bias in Science

We all know the old saying “you need to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes.” Because everyone comes at life from a different background, stepping into somebody else’s Nikes or high heels can be extraordinarily difficult. What’s more, it’s becoming more and more apparent that workplace conflicts may arise from biases that we are not even aware we have. This collection of presentations explores where these biases come from and how we can make ourselves more conscience of them. Having a better awareness for this, so called, implicit bias in the workplace will help to make a more positive scientific and learning environment.

Presentations:
#1 “Implicit and explicit bias in science and science education”
Charlotte Tate, PhD, San Francisco State University

#2 Implicit bias: What is it- and what can we do about it?”
Tamera Schneider, PhD, Wright State University

#3 Surviving and thriving in the Post-Weinstein Word”
Gretchen Dahlinger Means, JD, University of Southern California

You can find links to the presentations here: http://www.the-aps.org/mm/Careers/Mentor/Implicit-Bias-in-Science

Joe Santin is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO. His research focuses on understanding how neural circuits in the brain work by studying a diverse range of animals.
June 7th, 2018
June 2018 Social Media Collection: Conflict Resolution

As scientists and educators, we often concern ourselves with doing the best experiment or scrambling to prepare for lecture. But the fact of the matter is a major part of our jobs may involve dealing with difficult people in the lab, classroom, and office. This collection of posts explores different types of conflicts that may arise, why they arise, and how to deal with them.

 

 

 

Post #1: The mentor-mentee relationship can be difficult. Here’s how to finish graduate school with a toxic mentor.

https://cheekyscientist.com/academic-advisor/ 


Post #2: Tips on handling conflict in the lab!

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2018/03/09/lab-conflict-and-how-to-address-it/ 

Post #3 A non-scientists perspective on dealing with difficult people

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chriscancialosi/2018/03/05/a-guide-to-dealing-with-difficult-people/#5fae68002293

Post #4 Science is collaborative, but who gets credit? Tips for negotiating authorship

https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v489/n7417/full/nj7417-591a.html

Post #5 We need to strive for equality in science. Women share their experience in STEM PhDs

https://www.bustle.com/p/9-women-in-stem-share-the-challenges-theyve-faced-in-a-male-dominated-field-70930

Joe Santin, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO. His research focuses on understanding how neural circuits in the brain work by studying a diverse range of animals.
May 21st, 2018
How to Search for the Perfect Job

Once you’ve decided it’s time to try your hand at finding a permanent position and you selected the career path you’d like to take, there are many ways to go about beginning your search. The following presentations provides information regarding 1) launching a job search, particularly for a dual-career couple; 2) delivering a job talk: formal seminar vs. chalk-talk; 3) the art of interviewing; and 4) negotiation tips. There is also a mock interview and potential interview questions.

 

 

Presentations

Launching a Job Search
Colleen Cosgrove Hegg, Ph.D., Michigan State University

Delivering a Dynamic Job Talk
Susan C. McKarns, Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine

The Art of Interviewing: Winning the Job
Lynn Wecker, Ph.D., University of South Florida College of Medicine

Navigating Negotiations
Kim E. Barrett, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego

Mock Interview and Negotiation Videos
Potential Interview Questions

 

You can find links to all presentations here: http://www.the-aps.org/mm/Careers/Mentor/Job-Search-and-Interviews/Postdoctoral-Fellows/How-to-search-for-the-perfect-job-/Gainfully-Employed

 

Kristine Y. DeLeon-Pennell, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the Medical University of South Carolina and at Ralph H Johnson VAMC. She researches how the immune system regulates the wound healing response in cardiovascular disease.
May 7th, 2018
May 2018 Social Media Collection: How to Get a Job

You’ve graduated or completed your postdoctoral fellowship, now what? Moving on to the next career phase can be difficult. Believe me I just did it. It’s important for all young scientists to explore their career options and be open to ‘unconventional’ paths that get you to your ultimate goal. The following post are just a few tips on how to find a job.

 

 

 

Post 1: April showers bring May jobs?? Networking as tool to find your next position

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2013/06/20/networking-tips-for-graduate-students

 

Post 2: You’ve slaved away and now it’s time to move on. But how? Here’s a few tips to finding a job.

https://www.labsexplorer.com/c/where-to-find-a-job-after-a-phd-or-a-postdoc_30

 

Post 3: Top 4 Job Clusters for the life sciences

http://cheekyscientist.com/life-science-career-clusters-for-employment-opportunities/

  Kristine Y. DeLeon-Pennell, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the Medical University of South Carolina and at Ralph H Johnson VAMC. She researches how the immune system regulates the wound healing response in cardiovascular disease.