Author Archives: Allison Hood

November 2018 Social Media Collection: Peer Mentoring

Mentorship is critical for success as a scientific researcher. The traditional view of mentoring is a one-on-one professional relationship between a senior and junior investigator.  However, participating in a network or group of “near peer” or “peer” mentors can be more effective for both the mentor and mentee. The goal of this blog is to provide resources to help scientists become more educated on the benefits of peer mentoring, steps to take to be an effective peer mentor, and provide ways of creating opportunities to foster peer mentoring relationships. The first article discusses the pros and cons of traditional or hierarchical one-on-one mentoring and lays the ground work in support of mentoring networks involving peer mentors. In subsequent articles, we delve into near peer and peer mentoring and highlight some of the advantages and benefits of peer mentoring, practical methods to be an effective peer mentor, and how to start your own peer mentoring group.

 

Post #1: Should we do away with hierarchical one-on-one mentoring?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23425990

 

Post #2: Looking beyond traditional mentoring. Why peer mentoring may be more superior.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/362/6414/532.1.long

 

Post #3: Have you underestimated the value of mentoring?

https://www.labmanager.com/leadership-and-staffing/2017/07/the-value-of-mentorship-in-the-scientific-field#.W9nOe9VKi70

 

Post #4: Advantages of participating in peer mentoring. Is this the missing piece to being a successful post-doc?

https://www.nature.com/articles/nbt.3631

 

Post #5: Success isn’t achieved alone. How peer mentoring can benefit yourself and others.

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2004/08/peer-mentoring-part-1-why-we-must-lift-we-climb

 

Post #6: Practical methods to participate in peer mentoring.

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2004/09/peer-mentoring-part-2-practical-methods-lift-we-climb

 

Post #7: Want to help other scientists be successful? Form a peer mentoring group with these 5 easy steps.

https://blog.addgene.org/form-your-own-peer-mentoring-circle-a-how-to-guide-for-scientists

 

Post #8: Do you know the advantages of peer mentoring?

https://www.ascb.org/compass/compass-points/peer-mentoring-scientific-researcher/

 

Post #9: Are you a woman in science and want more mentorship? Check out this program!

https://www.nature.com/articles/nbt.1799

 

Post #10: Unexpected benefits for mentors from underrepresented backgrounds in near-peer mentoring.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5034940/

 

 

Kristi Streeter, PhD is a research assistant scientist at the University of Florida. Her interests are in understanding the cardiorespiratory impact of diaphragm sensory afferents and utilizing electrical stimulation to restore afferent input, engage spinal networks, and induce neuroplasticity to improve breathing following spinal cord injury.
Kick Start Your funding: Looking Beyond NIH and NSF

Funding for scientific research is becoming progressively harder to obtain and competition continues to grow. Despite the increased challenge to gain federal funding (i.e. NIH), many universities and other institutions require their applicants to have funding when applying for faculty positions, regardless of their career stage. As such, an enormous amount of pressure is placed on trainees to obtain funding prior to looking for a position as an independent scientist. In addition, early career investigators who have already transitioned to independent positions also experience similar pressures and difficulties obtaining funding. In recognition of the funding crisis as well as the increasingly competitive job market for trainees and early career investigators, the goal of this symposium is to provide information on funding sources outside of the NIH and NSF. We have four speakers with each representing less tradition funding mechanisms including 1) industry, 2) private foundations, 3) crowd-funding, and 4) military funding. Each speaker identifies how to find funding within their genre, provide information and tips for writing successful grant proposals, and compare and contrast their organization with how other funding mechanisms (i.e. NIH) work. The speakers have either successfully obtained funding or are representatives from companies or private foundations that have grant programs or regularly fund product research. Information is also available on crowd funding websites.

Presentations

  • Seeking funding outside the norm: unique opportunities within military research programs
    Lisa Leon, Ph.D.US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine
  • Successfully securing funding and collaborating with industry
    Eugene W. Shek, Ph.D.Lilly China Research and Development Co., Ltd.
  • Cancer funding from a private foundation
    Charles Saxe, Ph.D.The American Cancer Society
  • Crowd funding your science
    Melissa Wilson Sayres, Ph.D.Arizona State University

 You can find links to all presentations here:

http://www.the-aps.org/mm/Careers/Mentor/Kick-Start-your-funding-Looking-beyond-NIH-and-NSF

Melinda Engevik, PhD is an instructor at Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine. Her research focuses on the interaction between intestinal microbiota and the host epithelium.
October 2018 Social Media Collection: Borrowing Skills from Business

Leadership, management, budgeting, and marketing sound like skills for CEOs, not scientists. However, these skill sets are also essential for researchers and there are several principles that can be taken from the business world and applied to academia. Accumulating evidence suggests that mixing business with science is a path to success.

Post #1: This month we will be discussing Borrowing skills from business: application for research, stay tuned!

 

Post #2:  Business principles for basic researchers

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2016/10/business-principles-basic-researchers 

 

 

Post #3: Why scientists need to market themselves

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02747-y

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #4: The Why and How of Promoting Your Science Publication Online

https://bitesizebio.com/27823/the-why-and-how-of-promoting-your-science-publication-online/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #5: Selling for scientists

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2014/03/21/selling-for-scientists/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #6 Develop your career label so that it works in your favor

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/09/develop-your-career-label-so-it-works-your-favor

 

 

 

 

Post #7: How to market yourself as a graduate student

https://www.grad.umn.edu/marketingyourself

 

Post #8: Postdoc advancement: Marketing your value

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2013/08/postdoc-advancement-marketing-your-value

 

 

Post #9: Do I make myself clear? Media training for scientists

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2018/01/do-i-make-myself-clear-media-training-scientists

 

 

 

 

 

Post #10: Improving science communication in 3 easy steps

https://www.novartis.com/stories/from-our-labs/improving-science-communication-3-easy-steps

 

Post #11: The Basics of Lab Management

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2012/05/lab-management

 

Post #12: Project Management for Scientists

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/07/project-management-scientists

 

Post #13: Project Management for Scientists, Part 1: An Overview

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/05/project-management-scientists-part-1-overview

 

Post #14: Project Management for Scientists, Part 2: Getting Experience

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/06/project-management-scientists-part-2-getting-experience

 

Post #15: Project Management for Postdocs

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/03/take-your-worst-estimate-and-double-it-project-management-postdocs

 

Post #16: Crowdsourcing goes academic with platforms for reviewing advisers

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/02/crowdsourcing-goes-academic-platforms-reviewing-advisers

 

Post #17: These books can offer career guidance and inspiration

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/09/these-books-can-offer-career-guidance-and-inspiration

Melinda Engevik, PhD is an instructor at Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine. Her research focuses on the interaction between intestinal microbiota and the host epithelium.
Discovering the Leader Within You: Where You’ve Been

What are the factors that will make you achieve your scientific career goals? In this presentation, Dr. Thomas Herzig uses a new perspective to discuss the importance of developing different sets of skills according to your career purposes. These skills will complement your CV (education and publications record) and will help you prepare towards the next step of your professional career.

Presentation features Captain Thomas Herzig, PhD

Link of the presentation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0yPtl3Z878

http://www.the-aps.org/leadership

 

Miguel Zarate, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. His research focuses on the interactions between the fetal immune system and nutrient metabolism in inflammatory challenge and intra-uterine growth restriction models in sheep, mice, and humans.
September 2018 Social Media Collection: Science Communication

Science communication is relevant for all professionals nowadays. Educating citizenry is essential to understand the role of science in people’s lives. Likewise, improving your communication skills can help you tremendously towards the next steps in your career either in academia or industry. Sharing our research effectively can reduce the gap of uncertainty that we scientists often have with non-expert audiences. The following posts will teach you how to be an effective communicator by learning science communication tips and reading successful stories.

 

Post #1: How to improve your communication skills in science

https://www.aaas.org/comm-toolkit

 

Post #2:  how to explain your science in different situations

https://www.nia.nih.gov/research/blog/2014/11/explaining-your-science-tips-clear-communication 

 

Post #3: How can you get noticed in your early career? (for students)

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2011/03/16/phd-students-how-to-improve-your-communication-skills-and-why-you-should/ 

 

Post #4: Why is necessary to have effective science communication to the non-expert? The story of Elizabeth Bass

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.023297?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&

 

Post #5: Could baby’s first bacteria take root before birth? A controversial science topic explained for all audiences.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-00664-8 

 

Post #6: 11 tips for communicating science to the public.

https://www.aaas.org/blog/qualia/11-tips-communicating-science-public

 

Post #7: Podcast. Alan Alda’s experiment: helping scientists learn to talk to the rest of us.

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/04/531271710/alan-aldas-experiment-helping-scientists-learn-to-talk-to-the-rest-of-us

 

Post #8: 14 current hot science topics and an effective way to describe their importance to the non-expert.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/here-are-stories-will-make-science-headlines-2018

 

Miguel Zarate, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. His research focuses on the interactions between the fetal immune system and nutrient metabolism in inflammatory challenge and intra-uterine growth restriction models in sheep, mice, and humans.