Category Archives: Professional Development

December 2018 Social Media Collection: Persevering in Science

Reject, reject, reject! Careers in science are full of set-backs.  Papers get rejected, grant proposals are triaged, promotions are denied. So how do we overcome what seems to be an endless barrage of obstacles? This month we will be discussing some of the major challenges frequently faced by scientists and identify key strategies to persevere while pursuing a successful career in science.

Post #1: You don’t need to be a Noble Laureate to know science is a tough gig! Check out the link for advice from past Nobel winners on pushing through setbacks to succeed.

http://www.nobelprizeii.org/video-category/surprises-setbacks/

 

Post #2: Scientist faces some big challenges in pursuing a career. This article identifies some of the largest obstacles and addresses what we can do to fix it.

https://www.vox.com/2016/7/14/12016710/science-challeges-research-funding-peer-review-process

 

Post #3: Surviving academia as an early career researcher: an unreliable guide

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2017/10/27/surviving-academia-as-an-ecr-an-unreliable-guide/

 

Post #4: Mind Matters: Resilience

https://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2011/06/mind-matters-resilience

 

Post #5: In the job search, it pays to take the difficult path

https://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/05/job-search-it-pays-take-difficult-path

 

Post #6: A PhD Job Search – What’s Normal and What’s Not Normal

https://cheekyscientist.com/phd-job-search/

 

Post #7: Managing the Emotional Side of Job Search

https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2018-02-16/managing-the-emotional-side-of-job-search

 

Post #8: Recognizing and managing stress in academic life

https://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/blog/2012/jun/13/managing-academic-stress

 

Post #9: Emotional Fatigue: Coping with Academic Pressure

http://gradresources.org/dealing-with-emotional-fatigue/

 

 

 

 

Lauren Stein, PhD is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on the neuroendocrine control of energy balance using rodent models of obesity.
October 2018 Social Media Collection: Borrowing Skills from Business

Leadership, management, budgeting, and marketing sound like skills for CEOs, not scientists. However, these skill sets are also essential for researchers and there are several principles that can be taken from the business world and applied to academia. Accumulating evidence suggests that mixing business with science is a path to success.

Post #1: This month we will be discussing Borrowing skills from business: application for research, stay tuned!

 

Post #2:  Business principles for basic researchers

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2016/10/business-principles-basic-researchers 

 

 

Post #3: Why scientists need to market themselves

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02747-y

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #4: The Why and How of Promoting Your Science Publication Online

https://bitesizebio.com/27823/the-why-and-how-of-promoting-your-science-publication-online/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #5: Selling for scientists

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2014/03/21/selling-for-scientists/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #6 Develop your career label so that it works in your favor

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/09/develop-your-career-label-so-it-works-your-favor

 

 

 

 

Post #7: How to market yourself as a graduate student

https://www.grad.umn.edu/marketingyourself

 

Post #8: Postdoc advancement: Marketing your value

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2013/08/postdoc-advancement-marketing-your-value

 

 

Post #9: Do I make myself clear? Media training for scientists

http://www.sciencemag.org/features/2018/01/do-i-make-myself-clear-media-training-scientists

 

 

 

 

 

Post #10: Improving science communication in 3 easy steps

https://www.novartis.com/stories/from-our-labs/improving-science-communication-3-easy-steps

 

Post #11: The Basics of Lab Management

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2012/05/lab-management

 

Post #12: Project Management for Scientists

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/07/project-management-scientists

 

Post #13: Project Management for Scientists, Part 1: An Overview

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/05/project-management-scientists-part-1-overview

 

Post #14: Project Management for Scientists, Part 2: Getting Experience

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/06/project-management-scientists-part-2-getting-experience

 

Post #15: Project Management for Postdocs

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2002/03/take-your-worst-estimate-and-double-it-project-management-postdocs

 

Post #16: Crowdsourcing goes academic with platforms for reviewing advisers

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/02/crowdsourcing-goes-academic-platforms-reviewing-advisers

 

Post #17: These books can offer career guidance and inspiration

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/09/these-books-can-offer-career-guidance-and-inspiration

Melinda Engevik, PhD is an instructor at Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine. Her research focuses on the interaction between intestinal microbiota and the host epithelium.
Negotiating Is a Skill – Let’s Learn It Together

Negotiation is both a skill and an art. Understanding your strengths and weakness will help you to best promote yourself and succeed in interviews and getting the position you are aiming for. By learning about your personality type, and that of others, you will be able to not only put your best foot forward, but to utilize your knowledge to manage expectations of other personality types. We will open a window onto the negotiation skills for every step of the way, from getting a position to climbing the ladder of success in diverse settings. Getting a position is not the end of the negotiation process. These skills will continue to be useful throughout your career as you ask for promotions, work in committees, move into new spaces, apply for both internal and external grants, and navigate the hierarchy at your institution. The Women in Physiology Mentoring Symposium for EB 2016 will focus on what negotiation really is: using the right tools and the right approach to succeed in any discipline. To address this issue, we will discuss personality types, help you to determine yours and teach you skills to maximize your strengths based on your gender and your own personality. In addition, negotiation skills will be discussed, both in general and in more specific areas with a panel of speakers from various fields, including academia, industry and the military. These speakers will give an overview of specific negotiation skills related to these environments, including issues you should be aware of, what you should ask for, how to ask, and what’s “soft” in each setting. These presentations will be followed by an additional 20 minutes question and answer session with the speaker panel.

 

Presentations

  • Making Your Personality Type Work for You
    Diane Klotz, Sanford Burnham Presby Medical Discovery Institute
  • Negotiation 101: Skills Everyone Needs
    Trevor Blair, Manpower 
  • Negotiation 201: Industry Sales/Marketing
    Katherine Atkinson, Illumina, Inc.
  • Negotiation 201: Industry R&D
    Magdalena Alonso-Galicia, Bayer HealthCare LLC 
  • Negotiation 201: Academia Research
    Kim BarrettUCSD
  • Negotiation 201: Academia Teaching
    Jennifer K Uno, Elon Univ. 
  • Negotiation 201: Military
    Kathy Ryan, US Army Institute of Surgical Res,
  • Panel Discussion

 

You can find links to all presentations here: http://www.the-aps.org/negotiating

https://www.lifescitrc.org/searchResultsAll.cfm?resourceID=35

Malgorzata Kasztan, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She researches how the endothelin system alters renal structure and function in chronic kidney disease.
July 2018 Social Media Collection: Negotiation

Negotiation is both a skill and an art. Understanding your strengths and weakness will help you to best promote yourself and succeed in interviews and getting the position you are aiming for. By learning about your personality type, and that of others, you will be able to not only put your best foot forward, but to utilize your knowledge to manage expectations of other personality types.

 

 

Post #1:  Want to learn more about negotiating? Start reading our July “Negotiation series”. First round – “Know These Things Before Negotiating”

http://theprofessorisin.com/2018/02/09/know-these-things-before-negotiating/

Post #2: Can I negotiate?

http://theprofessorisin.com/2016/03/21/can-i-negotiate-advice-for-all-especially-international-ph-d-s/

Post #3: Academic Scientists at Work: Negotiating a Faculty Position

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2005/02/academic-scientists-work-negotiating-faculty-position-0

Post #4: How to negotiate your tenure track offer?

http://theprofessorisin.com/2016/02/11/how-to-negotiate-your-tenure-track-offer/

Post #5:  Do’s and Don’ts! Round 5 – How (Not) to Negotiate a Tenure Track Salary

http://theprofessorisin.com/2017/02/24/how-not-to-negotiate-a-tenure-track-salary/ 

Post #6: Dual career couples have become a norm. How to search and negotiation for two 

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2018/06/until-academic-careers-do-us-part

Post #7: What does it take to make an institution more diverse?

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05317-4

Post #8: Managing Up in Academe. Let’s learn about effective professional communication and productivity!

https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2018/04/16/how-work-most-effectively-your-supervisor-opinion?

Post #9: Negotiating As Therapy

http://theprofessorisin.com/2018/03/16/negotiating-as-therapy/

Post #10: Job X Is Not Job Y (And Wishing Won’t Make It So)

http://theprofessorisin.com/2018/04/21/job-x-is-not-job-y-and-wishing-wont-make-it-so/

Post #11:  Negotiation Tactics and Strategies

http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2000/03/negotiation-tactics-and-strategies

Malgorzata Kasztan, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She researches how the endothelin system alters kidney structure and function in different models of chronic kidney disease.
Recognizing Bias in Science

We all know the old saying “you need to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes.” Because everyone comes at life from a different background, stepping into somebody else’s Nikes or high heels can be extraordinarily difficult. What’s more, it’s becoming more and more apparent that workplace conflicts may arise from biases that we are not even aware we have. This collection of presentations explores where these biases come from and how we can make ourselves more conscience of them. Having a better awareness for this, so called, implicit bias in the workplace will help to make a more positive scientific and learning environment.

Presentations:
#1 “Implicit and explicit bias in science and science education”
Charlotte Tate, PhD, San Francisco State University

#2 Implicit bias: What is it- and what can we do about it?”
Tamera Schneider, PhD, Wright State University

#3 Surviving and thriving in the Post-Weinstein Word”
Gretchen Dahlinger Means, JD, University of Southern California

You can find links to the presentations here: http://www.the-aps.org/mm/Careers/Mentor/Implicit-Bias-in-Science

Joe Santin is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO. His research focuses on understanding how neural circuits in the brain work by studying a diverse range of animals.
June 2018 Social Media Collection: Conflict Resolution

As scientists and educators, we often concern ourselves with doing the best experiment or scrambling to prepare for lecture. But the fact of the matter is a major part of our jobs may involve dealing with difficult people in the lab, classroom, and office. This collection of posts explores different types of conflicts that may arise, why they arise, and how to deal with them.

 

 

 

Post #1: The mentor-mentee relationship can be difficult. Here’s how to finish graduate school with a toxic mentor.

https://cheekyscientist.com/academic-advisor/ 


Post #2: Tips on handling conflict in the lab!

http://blogs.nature.com/naturejobs/2018/03/09/lab-conflict-and-how-to-address-it/ 

Post #3 A non-scientists perspective on dealing with difficult people

https://www.forbes.com/sites/chriscancialosi/2018/03/05/a-guide-to-dealing-with-difficult-people/#5fae68002293

Post #4 Science is collaborative, but who gets credit? Tips for negotiating authorship

https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v489/n7417/full/nj7417-591a.html

Post #5 We need to strive for equality in science. Women share their experience in STEM PhDs

https://www.bustle.com/p/9-women-in-stem-share-the-challenges-theyve-faced-in-a-male-dominated-field-70930

Joe Santin, PhD is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO. His research focuses on understanding how neural circuits in the brain work by studying a diverse range of animals.
Setting Your Sites on an Industry Career

Love for research is one thing, but knowing the right research environment that suits your personality and research goals may be the factor that makes you successful in securing an industry position and accomplishing your goals as a successful scientist. Dr. Bryan Clay touched on major differences between research in industry and academia in his 2017 Mentoring Symposium talk entitled, “Selecting a Good Lab for Postdoctoral or Research Experience in Industry.” Unlike academia, the main research goal in industry is to bring a product to market; as a result, the timeline is critical and usually quick, research is conducted in teams, and teams are more specialized and diverse in order to achieve that goal. How can you find positions in industry? There are various platforms that trainees can utilize in searching for industry positions. Platforms like company websites, Biospace, Medzilla, Indeed, LinkedIn, networking events, industry postdocs, and internships are  all useful resources for securing an industry position. When applying for industry positions, it is important to start early, typically 6 months or more before your desired start date. Also, you should be open to relocating, tailor your resume, and highlight research experiences that fit the position that you are applying for. Finally, network, network, and network! In addition, before applying for that industry position it is important to know the advantages and disadvantages between small biotech and big pharmaceutical companies. Small biotech companies usually have less resources, but you may have more influence and gain more experience working in biotech companies. Because resources are limited, research teams may not be as diverse as in big pharmaceutical companies, hence scientists in small biotech companies may participate in all aspects of the project. Overall, own your career and do what fulfills you. To listen to the presentation in its entirety, click on the link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6kTHTdLmq8

Ijeoma Obi is a PhD Candidate at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Section of Cardio-Renal Physiology and Medicine. Her research project focuses on the effects of early life stress on renal inflammation and blood pressure regulation.
Experimental Biology (EB)

With EB around the corner, don’t forget to download the free, easy-to use EB2018 mobile App on your Android and Apple smartphones and tablets. The App makes it easy to search for abstracts, specific sessions, and exhibitors. Session searches can also be filtered by discipline, sponsor, track, or type. In addition, the App includes maps of the entire convention center and tips for how to use the App.

To download the App, click on the link below and follow the instructions…

http://experimentalbiology.org/2018/Program/EB-Mobile-App.aspx

 

Furthermore, EB has partnered with an international film and broadcasting company to bring EB TV to this year’s conference. The daily program will consist of two main features: (1) Conference news which includes onsite interviews, event highlights, and attendees’ reaction and thoughts, and (2) In-depth reports in the form of five minute documentary films discussing research programs from various research institutions around the world. So, while you are planning on taking advantage of all the events and programs scheduled for this year’s conference, stay safe and enjoy your stay in San Diego!


Experimental Biology Conference- Frequently Asked Questions

http://experimentalbiology.org/2018/About-EB/Frequenty-Asked-Questions.aspx

 

2018 Experimental Biology Career Center Activities

http://experimentalbiology.org/2018/Career-Resources/Career-Center/EB2018-Career-Center-Schedule.aspx


The NEW Trainee Hour

APS Trainee Symposium: Do it Again: How to Achieve Rigorously Reproducible Research

Date: Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday,  April 22, 23, 24

Time: 7:00-8:00am

Location: Convention Center, Room 25A

 

APS Mentoring Symposium: Recognizing and Responding to Implicit Bias in Science

Date: Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday,  April 22, 23, 24

Time: 7:00-8:00am

Location: Convention Center, Room 25C

 

APS Career Symposium: Hallmarks of Ground Rules for Productive Collaborations in Science

Date: Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday,  April 22, 23, 24

Time: 7:00-8:00am

Location: Convention Center, Room 25B


APS David Bruce Undergraduate Poster Session and the Horwitz/Horowitz Awards Ceremony

Date: Sunday, April 22nd

Time: 4:00*-5:30pm

Location: Convention Center, Sails Pavilion

* Undergraduate presenters should arrive at 3:00 PM to hang posters and meet with graduate departments


Physiologist in Industry Committee Mixer

Date: Sunday, April 22, 2018

Time: 6:45-8:00pm

Location: Oceanside Room in the San Diego Marriot Marquis and Marina Hotel


Publishing 101: How to Get your Work Published and Avoid Ethical Minefields

Date: Monday, April 23rd

Time: 8:30-10:00am

Location: Convention Center, Room 28DE


Nobel Laureate, Dr. Leland Hartwell

Date: Wednesday, April 25th

Time: 3:30-4:30am

Location: Convention Center, Room 20A

Ijeoma Obi is a PhD Candidate at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Section of Cardio-Renal Physiology and Medicine. Her research project focuses on the effects of early life stress on renal inflammation and blood pressure regulation.